Lives & Webinars Program: first month.


sbpmat-Lives-logo_1500pxDuring the month of June, five technical webinars were held on the Zoom platform, with live transmission via B-MRS’s Facebook platform, within the Live & Webinars program, organized by B-MRS in partnership with instrumentation companies.

By the end of August, 12 more webinars will be offered. The program includes a variety of subjects, from fundamentals and applications of techniques widely used by the Materials research community, to the presentation of state-of-the-art research instruments and digital tools for teaching in the field of Materials.

The already held online seminars had audiences of up to 500 participants. “We are happy to see that many people, especially young people, are using this pandemic time to gain knowledge and for self-improvement,” says Professor Mônica Cotta, president of B-MRS, who has participated in all the seminars.

Programming, information and registration (free): https://www.sbpmat.org.br/en/lives-webinars/

Watch the past webinars recordings:

  • “Micro-XRF aplicado a Ciências dos Materiais” (Essencis and Bruker). See here.
  • “Microscopias FTIR, Raman e Eletrônica de Transmissão para Análise de Materiais” (Thermo Fisher). See here.
  • “Técnicas de magnetometria para a pesquisa em nanopartículas magnéticas” (Quantum Design). See here.
  • “3D optical profilometry for material science applications” (Sensofar and Analítica). See here.
  • “Crossbeam laser – Enabling New Microscopy Workflows Through Gentle Large-Volume Material Removal” (Zeiss). See here.

Featured scientist: Edson Roberto Leite.


Prof Edson Roberto Leite
Prof Edson Roberto Leite

Edson Roberto Leite memories related to science are all very pleasant: the book about rockets in his childhood in the interior of São Paulo, the opportunity to use an exceptional microscope during the sabbatical period in the United States, the discovery of a mechanism for the growth of nanocrystals at the Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory…

Some of these wonderful memories include the many occasions experienced alongside his tutor and scientific father, Professor José Arana Varela, a prominent Brazilian materials scientist who died in 2016. Arana Varela was honored by B-MRS with the creation, in 2019, of an award that bears his name, and which annually distinguishes a prominent researcher from Brazil, who gives a plenary lecture at the Society’s annual event. In its first edition, the award was befittingly granted to Edson Roberto Leite, professor at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) and scientific director of the Brazilian National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano-CNPEM). Leite is also editor for Latin America of the Journal of Nanoparticle Research (Springer).

Edson Roberto Leite received his first degree in Materials Engineering from UFSCar in 1988. In doubt between pursuing a career in industry or academia, he initially tried to reconcile both. After graduating, he worked in the research and development area at 3M, while doing his master’s degree and starting his doctorate, both in Materials Science and Engineering at UFSCar. In 1992, he left the company in order to dedicate his time to the doctorate, a decision that he recalls did not please his father-in-law, who was concerned with the livelihood of the family that by now included two children. However, over the years, the results of this decision have been very positive. In 1994, shortly after defending his doctorate, Leite became a professor in the Chemistry Department at UFSCar and started a career as a researcher in materials, which would not only be fruitful, but also enjoyable.

Co-author of more than 400 scientific articles published with more than 19 thousand citations, today Leite has an h index of 72 (Google Scholar). The scientist is also the editor of three books related to materials for energy and co-author of a book on the process of nucleation and growth of nanocrystals. Leite received several awards, including the Scopus Prize from Elsevier/CAPES (2006), for the excellence of his scientific production as a whole, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2009), awarded to scientists with exceptional research skills. In 2012, Edson Leite was elected member of the World Academy of Ceramics and the Academy of Sciences of the State of São Paulo. In 2014, he was cochair of the Spring Meeting of Materials Research Society, held in San Frascisco (USA). In 2019 he was elected full member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences (ABC).

Read our interview and learn more about this scientist, his main contributions and his memories of Professor Arana Varela.

B-MRS newsletter: At school, you had more affinity with science subjects, right? Do you remember how this taste for science originated?

Edson Roberto Leite: A person’s story always has the personal version and the version of the people who interacted with him. I will recount my perspective of how it happened.

At school I always had a strong affinity for Science and History. A striking memory was when I was in the third grade of elementary school and my father took me to the Municipal Library of Araras to take out a membership card so I could access books. The first book I chose was about rockets. I have always loved the conquest of space and the science behind fundamental historical moments. It is noteworthy that man had reached the moon only a few years earlier, nuclear power was seen as the global energy solution and semiconductors were just beginning.

In addition to this fond memory, there were other motivations, including Jonny Quest, a really cool cartoon. This animation, in addition to the adventures, had a lot of science fiction, and Jonny’s father (Dr. Benton Quest) was a renowned scientist with an excellent research laboratory in his own home.

My childhood, then, was always marked by a strong influence of science classes. I think it easily guided me to choose Engineering. At first the idea was to become a mechanical engineer, but during my prep course for the entrance exam I was introduced to Materials Engineering, at UFSCar. I took the exam in the middle of 1983 and passed. From then on I knew what I wanted and what I liked.

However, there was still a doubt, whether to go to the academic area or go to industry (my father was a Nestlé employee in Araras and the industrial sector always caught my attention). During my undergraduate studies, I went to live at the student housing headed by Celso V. Santilli (today an important researcher in the field of Materials, Professor at IQ-UNESP-Araraquara) and he helped me to participate in an undergraduate research program with professors Elson Longo and José Arana Varela. That was when I learned what science was and that increased my taste for the academic area. In 1984, I had the first undergraduate scholarship from FAPESP under the guidance of Professor Varela (who was a visiting professor in the Materials Engineering department (DEMa) at UFSCar). In 1988 I graduated, joined the DEMa-UFSCar master’s degree program and went to work as a development engineer at 3M do Brasil, in Sumaré, SP. My director at 3M was the engineer Aloysio Pizarro and he released me for the master’s degree (which I defended in 1990 under the guidance of Professor Elson) and for the doctorate (in 1990). In 1992, I realized it would be impossible to reconcile the research area and my activities at 3M, so I left 3M to focus entirely on my academic research, returning to São Carlos. I finished my doctorate in 1993 under the supervision of Professor José A. Varela. In January 1994, I became an adjunct professor in the Chemistry department at UFSCar and joined LIEC (Interdisciplinary Laboratory of Electrochemistry and Ceramics), founded by Elson, Varela and Bulhões (Professor Luís Otávio S. Bulhões). I went back to the place that had introduced me to science.

Those moments influenced me…

B-MRS newsletter: In your assessment, what are your main contributions to the Materials area?

Edson Roberto Leite: Ever since undergraduate research, I have been working mainly with inorganic materials, more specifically with ceramic materials. So, I will report the contributions I believe are most important, according to my point of view (in fact these may be the contributions I most enjoyed working with).

Since 1994 I have been working with chemical and physical-chemical materials and have been involved in several areas, among them: chemical synthesis of ceramic oxides, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled size and morphology, growth of nanocrystals, electrical properties of ceramic oxides, materials for application in alternative energy devices and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During this period, always developing works in collaboration with professors Elson Longo and José A. Varela, at LIEC of DQ-UFSCar. Among these different areas I will highlight my contributions to the growth of nanocrystals and the work on alternative energy.

In 1998, that is, 4 years after I was hired, I went on a sabbatical in the USA, in the group of Professor Martin P. Harmer, at Lehigh University (Betlehem, PA). In my sabbatical, I worked on converting polycrystalline ceramics into monocrystalline ceramics, using controlled grain growth. It was a wonderful year and my recollection of that period is vivid in my memory. I still remember the smell of the laboratory and the friendships I cultivated. From a professional point of view, the work drew my attention to the process of solid-state crystal growth. My contribution to the project was to characterize the growth process using advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. At that time I had the opportunity to operate the VG-603 analytical transmission electron microscope. There were few microscopes like this being produced, and I still remember the words of the coordinator of the Lehigh microscopy laboratory, Dr. Dave Ackland saying that “few researchers in the world have had the honor of operating this equipment.” Returning to Brazil in 1999, I dedicated a lot of my time to microscopy and, with the help of the newly created Electronic Microscopy Laboratory of LNLS (created in 1997 by Dr. Daniel Ugarte), I began studying the process of growing nanocrystals in colloidal solution. I quickly identified, for SnO2 nanocrystals, a growth mechanism recently described in the literature known as “Oriented Attachment” (OA). The first article we published about this nanocrystal growth mechanism was in 2003. During this period I created a group of high-level master and doctoral students (today these students are researchers and professors), which truly allowed exploring this growth mechanism. In fact, we published, almost simultaneously with American groups, the first kinetic model to describe this growth process, and shortly afterwards we published two important articles, one related to the growth of anisotropic nanocrystals and the other correlating the OA process with a polymerization process. Both articles are considered pioneers in the area. International recognition in the area came with the invitation to publish two review articles (one at Nanoscale and the other at CrysEngComm), one of them in collaboration with leading international experts in the field of nanocrystal growth kinetics by OA.

I started working in alternative energy in 2004, when I helped organize a symposium on the theme at the MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco. After that, we invested in this area and, with a new group of brilliant students, we achieved fantastic results, between 2007 and 2016, regarding the development of hematite photo anodes to promote water photo-electrolysis aimed at hydrogen production. We developed an electrode manufacturing process based on colloidal nanocrystal deposition. This enabled the highest impact publications of my career, in journals such as JACS and Energy Environ. Sci. In the same period we developed a method for synthesizing MoS2 (2D material), combining non-hydrolytic sol-gel method and microwave reaction. This again resulted in excellent materials for electrocatalysis and for supercapacitors. This research also enabled publications in high-impact journals, such as Chem. Comm and Advanced Energy Materials. Without a doubt, this team of students placed us in the state-of-the-art to develop materials for alternative energy.

I would like to highlight just one more important contribution, which was in the study of the combustion process in glass-melting furnaces, carried out with funding from White Martins/Praxair. In this work, carried out with Professor Carlos Paskocimas (currently at UFRN) and Professors Elson and Varela, we characterized the corrosion rate of the furnaces and proposed technological solutions to inhibit this corrosion. This work was a success at the time and we were invited to present the results at Corning Glass and Praxair in the United States.

B-MRS newsletter: You were celebrated in the first edition of the B-MRS José Arana Varela award, which honors this prominent Brazilian scientist (who died in 2016), former president of B-MRS. Professor Varela was your doctoral advisor and co-author of many published articles. Could you share with us some memories about Professor Varela and comment on the scientific partnership both of you developed over time? Feel free to leave any more personal comments.

Edson Roberto Leite: As I mentioned above, I was introduced to Professors Varela and Elson during my undergraduate years, and Professor Varela was my undergraduate and PhD advisor. In fact, I was Varela’s first doctoral student, in 1993. Being the first to win this award is an honor, which made me very happy. Besides being my advisor, Professor Varela was a tutor and almost a father, teaching me and introducing me to the national and international scientific community. It was with him that I made my first trip abroad, in 1993, where he introduced me to the great names of international Ceramics at the American Congress of The American Ceramic Society. It was at this opportunity that I met Professor Gary Messing and Professor Harmer. I remember him introducing me to the famous Professor W.D. Kingery, the father of modern Ceramics. It was Varela who encouraged me to be a member of World Academy of Ceramics. There were several trips, opening new work fronts and new research areas. As a tutor and advisor he knew how to get my attention and point out my mistakes. I remember, more recently, at an MRS Fall meeting in Boston (USA), a long discussion that we had where he, without hesitation, “pulled my ear” and helped me handle future problems I would face as a group leader in the Materials Chemistry area. I know he saw me as a rebellious student, but I’m sure he was proud of the training he gave me. His premature death took me by surprise and I miss him very much. I miss our discussions, our conversations and especially his advice and guidance.

B-MRS newsletter: Please leave a message for our younger readers who are starting a scientific career or are evaluating this possibility.

Edson Roberto Leite: I am not good with words, my students and former students know that I am very direct. I never worried about planning my career, everything was happening as I followed my instincts. What I am today is largely due to my students and the support of two scientific parents, professors Elson and Varela. My job is not a job, it is a hobby. So my message is: To achieve success in a scientific career you must really like what you do.

Former B-MRS president Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira Junior is the author of a text about Brazilian science published in Folha de São Paulo


Prof. Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira Junior
Prof. Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira Junior

Professor Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira Junior (IFSC-USP), member and former president of SBPMat, is the author of a text published in Folha de São Paulo, one of the main Brazilian newspapers, on the blog ‘Darwin e Deus’ (column by science journalist Reinaldo José Lopes) about the success and impact of Brazilian science. In the text, the professor describes three types of knowledge resulting from science and highlights the importance of increasing the number of scientists and professionals trained in research environments in order to meet the demands of the Brazilian population.

Here follows the text:


The greatest proof of the success of Brazilian science is at the Planalto Palace. Were it not for the excellence of Brazilian medicine, the result of decades of scientific work, today there would be another President of the Republic.

Without the competence of the doctors of Juiz de Fora who promptly attended the then candidate after the stabbing episode, as well as the doctors in São Paulo who performed the other surgeries, President Bolsonaro, even if he survived, would not have recovered so quickly to the point of working normally shortly after the attack.

In my opinion, the connection between facts that change the direction of the country and Brazilian science does not seem to have been made as of yet. This is probably so because the effect of the different forms of knowledge that science creates has not been analyzed in detail.

Doing science generates three types of knowledge. The most visible and tangible is the knowledge that generates, in a relatively short time, technology and solutions for humanity. It is the knowledge transferred from scientists to technology innovators, which in the 21st Century has been accomplished mostly by the great technological powers, that is, the United States, China and other Asian countries, and some countries in Europe. Here, the majority term is essential, as it is not enough to have quality science and technology, as knowledge transfer only occurs effectively when there is a volume of research, products and solutions.

The two other types of knowledge are less visible to society in general. One is the knowledge derived from the curiosity and perseverance of humans in understanding how the universe works, without concern if there will be any practical application. Often, the application exists, but it will only become evident long after such knowledge has been generated. Perhaps the most emblematic example today is Einstein’s theory of relativity. It was created with an abstract conception, incomprehensible even for scientists of the time, to explain the phenomena of nature that had no correlation with people’s daily lives.

As far as I know, Einstein never suggested the possibility of a direct application to his theory. Well, the Theory of Relativity is now essential for positioning systems (GPS). Without taking into account the Theory of Relativity, determining the position of a person or object on Earth would be wrong for about 10 km with the errors accumulated in a week of GPS operation. In short, without the Theory of Relativity there would be no GPS or the navigation systems we use in our daily lives.

The third type of knowledge has so little visibility that it is confused with the result of university education. It is knowledge that does not lead directly to new technologies, but serves to absorb and adapt technologies, develop local solutions and allow high-level functioning of systems that depend on technology. This type of knowledge is incorporated by qualified professionals trained at research universities.

What is not always understood is that professionals with this level of skill and competence can only be trained in an environment where science is done. In medicine, to stay on the initial example, the incorporation and improvement of new technologies are usually done by doctors with sophisticated training, with postgraduate degrees and active participation in research programs conducted at universities of excellence.

For those who consider this third type of knowledge is of little relevance, I emphasize that countries with better quality of life and higher development rates are not on the list of those that generate more technology. I refer to Scandinavian countries and others like Switzerland and Luxembourg, which, due to the size of their population, are not large enough to generate a lot of technology – compared to the largest technology-producing countries. However, without any exception, all these countries with high quality of life have high density in generating knowledge of the third type, with excellent science.

And Brazil? Our country has outstanding examples of knowledge generation of the first type, with science providing competitive technology worldwide in sectors such as aeronautics, oil extraction in deep waters and agribusiness. Other sectors have created relevant technologies, albeit with less economic impact.

Unfortunately, despite the quality of science carried out in these sectors, density is low and we generate very little technology when the dimensions of the country and its population are taken into account. This is explained by the small size of our scientific system. Despite the great advance in recent decades, the number of scientists per inhabitant is still much smaller than that of developed countries. In this regard, Brazil does not appear on the list of the 20 best ranked countries.

A similar situation occurs in knowledge oriented to the development of local solutions, which I classified as a third type. Brazil trains excellent professionals at its research universities, which in turn incorporate new technologies and create solutions for society in many areas. This results in the country’s excellence in areas such as medicine and health, engineering, agriculture and livestock, and in many other areas.

Again, we have the density problem: the number of trained professionals, and their role in generating knowledge, is insufficient to benefit the entire Brazilian population. This insufficiency is at the root of our inequality, since the extremely low productivity at work depends essentially on the good functioning of technologies that demand knowledge of this third type, in which the supply of trained professionals is insufficient.

In short, the problem in Brazil is not low quality of science that is done here, but the low density of scientists and professionals trained to meet the demands of society. In addition to bringing the erroneous perception of lack of quality, the low density in fact makes it difficult (when not preventing) a country to achieve excellence in topics that require concentrated efforts of great importance. It is not for any other reason that Brazil is competitive in technologies, such as those already mentioned, in which there is a density of trained researchers, based on public policies initiated decades ago.

I expect our leaders, at all levels, will realize the direct and indirect benefits of a robust and quality scientific system. Even if it is for their survival in the event they need adequate health care. But mainly to fulfill the dream of transforming Brazil into a less unequal country.


 

Papers by the materials community in the Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences.


AABCSeven scientific articles on topics in the area of materials are part of the latest volume of the Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences (AABC). This is the result of the AABC call for articles in 2018, made in partnership with B-MRS, with the theme “Materials Sciences for a Better Future”. “This was a great opportunity to celebrate the success of materials research in Brazil,” says Professor Frank Crespilho, associate editor of AABC. To participate in the call, the authors submitted their work through the journal’s website at SciELO (an electronic library covering a selected collection of Brazilian scientific journals).

AABC publishes scientific articles from all fields of knowledge, and Materials Science and Technology works are welcome in all editions. AABC publications are free of cost to authors and open access. More information for authors can be found at http://www.scielo.br/revistas/aabc/iinstruc.htm.

According to the president of B-MRS, Professor Osvaldo Novais de Oliveira Junior, the growing importance of materials research has been revealed in major technological advances in all areas. In this context, B-MRS has played the role of bringing together students and researchers from Brazil, and their collaborators from other countries. “The partnership with the Brazilian Academy of Sciences is an important milestone of this performance of B-MRS, consolidated with this series of articles published in the Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences,” says the president of B-MRS. “The quality of the articles and variety of topics in this edition of the Annals are representative of the strength of the materials research community in Brazil,” he adds.

Published articles can be accessed free of charge (open access) in volume 91, number 4 of the Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. Following is the list of articles on topics in the area of Materials published in this issue of the magazine:

XIX B-MRS Meeting receives 49 symposium proposals from 18 different countries.


logo 19 encontroForty-nine (49) proposals were submitted by the international scientific community within the XIX B-MRS Meeting + IUMRS ICEM symposium call. The number of submissions is one of the largest in the history of B-MRS events. “We received proposals from 18 different countries,” says Professor Gustavo Dalpian, chair of the event.

The organizing committee is already working on the analysis of the proposals, in order to solve cases of thematic overlap and to ensure the symposia are adequate to the structure of the event. When necessary, the committee will contact the authors of the proposals. The final list of symposia will be announced as soon as possible on the event websiteB-MRS website, B-MRS Newsletter and social media. In February 2020, the abstract submission will be opened.

About the event

The event, which will be held from August 30 to September 3, 2020 at the Rafain Palace Hotel in Foz do Iguaçu (Brazil), will bring together the nineteenth edition of B-MRS annual meeting and the seventeenth edition of the international conference on electronic materials organized every two years by IUMRS.

In addition to symposia oral and poster presentations, the program will include plenary lectures by leading scientists such as Alex Zunger (University of Colorado Boulder, USA), Edson Leite (LNNano, Brazil), Hideo Hosono (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan), John Rogers (Northwestern University, USA), Luisa Torsi (Università degli Studi di Bari “A. Moro”, Italy) and Tao Deng (Shanghai Jiaotong University, China).

The event is coordinated by professors Gustavo Martini Dalpian (UFABC) in the general coordination, Carlos Cesar Bof Bufon (LNNANO) in the program coordination and Flavio Leandro de Souza (UFABC) as general secretary. At the international committee, the event features scientists from America, Asia, Europe and Oceania.

Camboriú Letter.


On the occasion of the XVIII Meeting of the Brazilian Materials Research Society (B-MRS), which brought together about 1800 researchers from Brazil and more than a dozen other countries, from September 22 to 26, 2019, in Balneário Camboriú, Santa Catarina, Brazil, B-MRS executive board and council are publicly expressing their concern about the cuts and contingencies of funds for education and research in Brazil. If cuts in public universities and research and postgraduate funding bodies such as CAPES, CNPq and Finep persist, the country will be doomed to setback in its development process. We emphasize that the need to contain public spending due to the economic crisis does not justify the cuts in science and education, as these cuts are much larger – in percentage – than in other areas of government.

As the history of nations’ progress shows, the prosperity and well-being of population is directly related to a country’s ability to generate and absorb knowledge. It is unbelievable that in the 21st Century it is still necessary to justify investments in research and knowledge generation. Especially in an era of space travel, unprecedented longevity for mankind, and technologies like mobile phones that allow communication that a few decades ago was only in science fiction books.

We would like to address the Brazilian society that pays taxes to maintain the country’s science, technology and innovation system. With so much false news spread today, questions may arise about the intentions of the academic and university community. One might wonder if such a manifesto is not just a corporatist defense of an elite that sees its interests affected by policies adopted with cuts and contingencies. This is a legitimate question, but also one that can be firmly answered by the B-MRS community. Making science and developing new technologies presupposes the search for the truth, so we cannot shy away from alerting Brazilian society about the consequences of current policies of attacks on public universities and investment cuts.

Even if people don’t realize it everyday, their lives are highly dependent on technology: for energy and communication through mobile phones, access to medical treatments, availability of clean water and affordable food. There are many examples of Brazilian technology that benefit the Brazilian population and economy, such as the most obvious ones in which Brazil has world leadership: deepwater oil exploration, agribusiness and the production of medium-sized aircraft. On the other hand, the existence of laboratories and trained personnel, resulting from the investment in science and technology of many decades, allowed Brazil to quickly unravel the mechanisms of action of Zika virus, which causes microcephaly in infants. Thanks to this knowledge, the same virus brings hope of treatment for brain tumors that today have no chance of cure. Mention should also be made of the need for training qualified professionals who can serve the population, which can only be achieved with a thriving university system that includes research.

The academic community must have a responsibility not to be an alarmist. However, it also has a duty to alert the Brazilian people to some of the effects that the destruction of our science, technology and innovation system will have – inevitable if policies of cuts persist. Worldwide, the largest contribution of resources to science and technology is made by the state; companies generally account for the cost of  applied research, built on the basic knowledge acquired in more fundamental studies. It is important to remember that the destruction of this system can be much faster than the decades required to build it.

We want to close this manifesto with a note of hope. In one of the lectures at the XVIII SBPMat Meeting, one of the achievements that makes Brazilian science proud was presented: the Sirius particle accelerator, installed at the National Center for Energy and Materials Research, in Campinas. Built with 85% national technology, Sirius is among the most advanced in the world, and can enable the generation of knowledge essential for many strategic areas for the Brazilian economy. The creation of Sirius is yet another demonstration of the capacity of the Brazilian scientific community, which we hope can continue its work. This will only be possible, however, if there is a change in policies for education and research in Brazil.

 

B-MRS Newsletter. Get ready for the XVIII B-MRS Meeting!


 

logo mini

The Newsletter of the
Brazilian Materials
Research Society.

Special issue:
Get ready for the XVIII B-MRS Meeting!

Message from the Chair

Dear attendees,

It will be a great honor to receive you in Balneário Camboriú-SC for the 18th Brazil-MRS Meeting, in the period of September 22nd-26th, 2019.

There is a remarkable list of top international plenarists, and 23 symposia in all scientific themes in materials science with high level of confirmed invited speakers. More than 2500 submitted papers, representing institutions of different countries and almost all regions of Brazil. This is a record in the history of the meeting.

We dedicated ourselves to offer you the best conditions for a productive period of science discussions and knowledge exchange in order to promote scientific cooperation.

I am looking forward seeing you in Balneário Camboriú.

With kind regards,

Ivan H. Bechtold – Chair

prof ivan

Useful information

Airport transfer. Do you want to book a transfer from the international airport of Navegantes or Florianópolis to Balneário Camboriú? You can contact by WhatsApp the booking desk of Guarupa (a Brazilian transportation app): +55 47 9130-9001.

Event venues. Due to the high participation and to ensure everyone’s comfort, the sessions and activities will take place in two hotels, 300 meters apart: Hotel Sibara Flat & Conventions and Mercure Camboriu Hotel. The opening session of the event will be held at the Cristo Luz Complex, one of the main tourist attractions in the city. Know more about the venues.

Shuttle to the opening session. There will be free shuttle service between Sibara Hotel and Cristo Luz Complex on Sunday 22 from 5 pm on. The complex is a 10-minute taxi/Uber ride from Sibara Hotel. It is recommended to arrive in advance.

Already registered participants. Participants who have already registered online can print their barcode to avoid queues. Access the event system with username and password, go to “Attendee” and “Print registration confirmation page”.

Onsite registration. Onsite registration remains open until the last day of the event at Sibara Hotel. B-MRS members have special discounts. You can become a member or renew your membership during the event’s registration and enjoy the special fees. See values.

Program. The program at a glance is available here. The presentation schedule, by symposium, is here. And the PDF file of the program book can be downloaded here. Changes in presentation times may still occur due to desistances. However, any changes will be updated on the online presentation schedule and app.

App of the event. The free app of the event is available at the official app stores of Android (Google Play) and Apple (App Store). Search “XVIII B-MRS Meeting” and download it to your smartphone. Features: schedule, maps, useful phones, personal schedule, QR code reader to access posters abstracts, and more.

Conference party. The party will take place on Wednesday 25, starting at 9 pm, at the lounge of the Green Valley Club, elected ‘The Most Prestigious International Club’ in 2013, 2015, 2018 and now 2019. The band of the party will be the “Brothers“. Tickets (limited) will be on sale for R$ 20 at the event secretariat from Monday 23.

Exhibitors fair. Visit the booths around the coffee break area, next to the secretariat, at Sibara Hotel!

Poster sessions. All symposia poster sessions will take place at Sibara Hotel, 17th floor, Adriatico room.

Students awards ceremony. The best students contributions presented during the meeting will receive prizes from B-MRS, ACS Publications journals and RSC journals. Prizes will only be awarded if the authors (students) are present at the ceremony, which will be held at the closing session of the event, on September 26 from 12:30 to 2 pm.

Memorial lecture. At Cristo Luz Complex (opening session).

On Sunday 22 in the opening session, at Cristo Luz Complex, Prof. Yvonne Primerano Mascarenhas (USP, Brazil) will give the B-MRS annual Memorial Lecture. Prof. Yvonne, a pioneer who led the introduction and development in Brazil of X-rays crystallography, will talk about the origins and panorama of this technique in the country. See our interview with her.

yvonne

Plenary Lectures. At Sibara Hotel, 4C floor.

On Monday 23 at 8:15 am, Prof. Stefano Baroni (SISSA, Italy) will talk about color expression in natural pigments, a basic science issue wit direct impact in the food industry, which he has been addressing using computational methods. Prof. Baroni is recognized for having made important contributions to the development of computational techniques for the study of materials at the nanoscale. See mini interview.

baroni

On Monday 23 at 4:45 pm, Prof. Norbert Koch (HU, Germany) will present promising structures for optoelectronic devices, which combine inorganic and organic semiconductors. Prof. Koch is the author of industry-impacting insights about the basic mechanisms that govern optoelectronic devices performance. See mini interview.

koch

On Tuesday 24 at 8:15 am, Prof. Antônio José Roque da Silva (CNPEM, Brazil) will talk about Sirius, the new Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source whose project and construction he has been leading since 2009. Sirius will be the largest and most complex scientific infrastructure ever built in the country and one of the first fourth-generation synchrotron lightsources of the world. Know more about Sirius.

roque da silva

On Tuesday 24 at 4:45 pm, Prof. Maria-Pau Ginebra (UPC, Spain) will discuss a new generation of bone graft biomaterials, made through nature-inspired methods, that bring together the advantages of natural and artificial bones. Prof. Ginebra has created a spin-off company to transfer the knowledge on these materials to “real life”. See mini interview.

maria pau

On Wednesday 25 at 8:15 am, Prof. Julia Greer (Caltech, USA), who is the author of seminal contributions to nanomechanics, will show a series of three-dimensional structures, based on innovatively engineered nanomaterials. Prof. Greer will share the synthesis, composition and amazing properties of her metamaterials. See mini interview.

julia greer

On Wednesday 25 at 4:45 pm, Prof. Mingzhong Wu (CSU, USA) will talk about a promising and yet enigmatic group of materials, the topological insulators. Prof. Wu will report his experiments on systems consisting of magnetic and topological insulators interacting between them, with interesting scientific results and potential applications. See mini interview.

wu

On Thursday 26 at 8:15 am, the plenary speaker will be Prof. Maurizio Prato (UNITS, Italy), an expert in adding organic molecules to the surface of carbon nanomaterials, opening up possibilities of applications in segments such as nanomedicine and energy. In the lecture, Prof. Prato will show fascinating results of using carbon nanomaterials for neuronal growth and clean energy generation. See mini interview.

prato

On Thursday 26 at 11:30 am, Prof. Alan Taub (U-M, USA), will address the integrated efforts needed to develop affordable lightweight components for vehicles. Prof. Taub has made a notable career in industry, culminating in the Vice Presidency of General Motor´s Global R&D.

alan taub

Other program highlights (free of charge for all event participants)

Sunday 22 from 1 to 5 pm at the 3rd floor of Sibara Hotel. Young Researchers School: How to Produce and Publish High Impact Papers. A tutorial by Prof. Valtencir Zucolotto (USP, Brazil) on high-impact research, writing and publication.

Tuesday 24, from 12:10 to 1:50 pm at Sibara Hotel, 3rd floor, Atlântico room. Material bonds: Brazilian-German exchanges in Materials Research. Representatives of German agencies will provide information on funding programmes and collaboration opportunities, and scientists working in the field of materials will share their experiences. Lunch boxes will be distributed on a first come, first served basis.

Tuesday 24 morning and afternoon at Sibara Hotel, 4C floor, Caspio room. Technical lectures. Companies in the field of scientific instrumentation will offer 13 technical lectures, 20 minutes each, on techniques and equipment for characterization of materials. See schedule.

Wednesday 25 from 12:10 to 1:50 pm at Sibara Hotel, 3rd floor, Persico room. Mastering the Art of Scientific Publication – ACS Publications’ Meet the Editors. A panel session about writing an effective paper, journal submission, review processes, and post-publication efforts with ACS editors. Lunch boxes will be distributed. Free registration in https://www.eventweb.com.br/xviiisbpmat/home-event/ (add/edit activities). Vacancies may have been filled.

Wednesday 25 from 12:10 to 1:50 pm at Sibara Hotel, 3rd floor, Atlântico room. Demonstration of ANSYS Granta’s software for materials research (CES Selector) and teaching (CES EduPack) with free software trial to all attendees. Lunch boxes will be distributed. Free registration in https://www.eventweb.com.br/xviiisbpmat/home-event/ (add/edit activities). Vacancies may have been filled.

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B-MRS Newsletter. Year 6, issue 8.


 

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Newsletter of the
Brazilian Materials
Research Society

Year 6, issue 8. September 9, 2019.

Featured Paper

Scientists from Brazil have discovered a potent anti-inflammatory effect on manganese-doped zinc germanate nanorods. In addition, the scientific team optimized the synthesis process of nanorods, reducing its duration to a few minutes. Nanostructures are promising for drug development. The work was recently published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry C. Know more.

paper destaque news

From Idea to Innovation

Ready to launch nanotechnology-based cosmetics, Nanomed has been active since 2012 in the development of nano-scale technologies focused on the health and wellness segments (notably, nanocapsules that protect and deliver substances of interest). Learn more about Nanomed and its founder, here.

Nanomed_news

News from B-MRS Members

– B-MRS member Bartolomeu Cruz Viana Neto (UFPI) has just been certified as an affiliate member of a regional unit of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences (ABC). See ABC article about the researcher, here.

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XVIII B-MRS Meeting/ Encontro da SBPMat
(Balneário Camboriú, Brazil, September 22 – 26, 2019)

Website: www.sbpmat.org.br/18encontro/

Registration. Online registration, here.

Pre-event tutorial for participants. Professor Valtencir Zucolotto (USP) will offer the Young Researchers School: How to Produce and Publish High Impact Papers for the event participants, free of charge. The tutorial will take place on September 22 from 13:00 to 17:00 at Sibara Hotel.

Technical lectures. Within the program of the event, companies in the field of scientific instrumentation will offer 13 technical lectures, 20 minutes each, on techniques and equipment for characterization of materials. See schedule.

Program. The program of the event “at a glance” is online, showing technical and social activities and the distribution of oral and poster sessions. See here. Full program, with all presentations by symposium, is also online. See here.

Posters printing service. The poster file can be sent by email and later pick up the impression at the event location. Know more.

Venue. The meeting will be held in the delightful Balneário Camboriú at two hotels located 300 meters apart: Hotel Sibara Flat & Conventions and, for oral sessions of symposia K, M, S and U, the Mercure Camboriu Hotel. The venues are located in the center of the city, close to many hotels, restaurants and shops, and some meters from the sea. See map here.

Opening ceremony venue. The opening ceremony, the memorial lecture and the welcome cocktail will be held on September 22 (Sunday) at the Cristo Luz complex, one of the main tourist attractions in the city. There will be transportation to the venue, leaving the Hotel Sibara from 17:00 on. See Cristo Luz complex here.

Memorial Lecture. The traditional Memorial Lecture Joaquim da Costa Ribeiro will be given by Professor Yvonne Primerano Mascarenhas (IFSC – USP). Know more about the speaker, here.

Event party. The party will be held in the lounge of the Green Valley, a prominent nightclub. Learn more about Green Valley, here. The party will feature the striking Brothers band. Watch the Brothers, here. Tickets for the party are limited and will be sold at R$ 20 at the event secretariat from Monday on.

Host city. Balneário Camboriú (SC) is an important tourist destination that offers urban and wild beaches, ecotourism and adventure sports, boat trips, bicycles and cable cars – all within a unique landscape that combines mountains, sea and skyscrapers. The visitor has access to many options of gastronomy, lodging and shopping, as well as the bustling nightlife that stands out in the Brazilian scenario.

Lodging, tickets, transfers etc. Check the hotel options and the official travel agency of the event, here.

Plenary lectures. Leading scientists from institutions in Germany, Italy, Spain and the United States will deliver plenary talks on cutting-edge issues at the event. There will also be a plenary session by the Brazilian scientist Antônio José Roque da Silva, director of CNPEM and the Sirius project (new Synchrotron Light Lab). Learn more about the plenary sessions, here.

Symposia. 23 symposia proposed by the international scientific community compose this edition of the event. See the symposia list, here.

Organization. The chair of the event is Professor Ivan Helmuth Bechtold (Physics Department of UFSC) and the co-chair is Professor Hugo Gallardo (Department of Chemistry of UFSC). The program committee is formed by professors Iêda dos Santos (UFPB), José Antônio Eiras (UFSCar), Marta Rosso Dotto (UFSC) and Mônica Cotta (Unicamp). Get to know all the organizers, here.

Exhibitors and sponsors. 50 sponsors and supporters participate in the event with interesting activities and actions.

More details coming soon in B-MRS next newsletter and social media.

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XIX B-MRS Meeting + IUMRS ICEM 2020
(Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil, August 30 – September 3, 2020)

Website: www.sbpmat.org.br/19encontro/

Joint event. The event will bring together the 19th edition of B-MRS’s annual meeting and the 17th edition of the International Conference on Electronic Materials organized every two years by the International Union of Materials Research Societies (IUMRS).

Call of symposia. B-MRS and IUMRS invite the international scientific community to submit symposium proposals by October 31, 2019. Learn more.

Organization. Professor Gustavo Martini Dalpian (UFABC) is the general coordinator, Carlos Cesar Bof Bufon (LNNANO) is the program coordinator and Flavio Leandro de Souza (UFABC) is the general secretary. At the international committee, the event features scientists from America, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Learn more at the event website.

Plenaries. Five internationally prominent scientists have already confirmed their presence as speakers at the event. Learn more at the event website.

Exhibitors and sponsors. Companies and other entities interested in attending the event as exhibitors, sponsors or supporters can contact Alexandre through the e-mail comercial@sbpmat.org.br.

Reading Tips

– In celebration of the XVIII B-MRS Meeting, the Royal Society of Chemistry prepared a collection of articles by Brazilian authors published between 2017 and 2019. Learn more.

– Scientists make ferroelectric a paraelectric material for a few picoseconds by applying light pulses at THz frequencies, opening up possibilities for developing ultrafast reconfiguration devices (Science paper). Know more.

– OLEDs: Scientists innovate by combining thick layers of perovskites with organic films into material that can be used to develop new generation of screens and lamps (Nature paper). Know more.

– Scientists can make gold sheets only two atoms thick and show that they are catalysts ten times more efficient than nanoparticles. Synthesis method opens possibilities for 2D versions of other metals (Advanced Science paper). Know more. Know more.

– Researchers develop injectable liquid that turns into gel and can be used to make medical procedures such as polyp removal during colonoscopy easier and safer (Advanced Science paper). Know more.

– Scientists can flatten conjugated polymer molecules, which tend to bend, thereby increasing their ability to conduct electricity (Science Advances paper). Know more.

– Impact factors 2018: results from Royal Society of Chemistry journals. Know more.

– Research conducted by scientists from Brazil shows strong action against fungi and tumors of a material obtained by irradiation of silver tungstate (paper from Scientific Reports). Know more.

Opportunities

Postdoctoral fellowship at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil). Know more.

Events

R2B Research to Business Itália-Rio de Janeiro. Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). September 19, 2019. Site.

XVIII B-MRS Meeting. Balneário Camboriú, SC (Brazil). September 22 – 26, 2019. Site.

XL CBRAVIC (Brazilian Congress on Vacuum Applications in Industry and Science). October 7 – 11, 2019. Site.

2° Encontro – Fronteiras Tecnológicas em Engenharia. Lorena, SP (Brazil). October 9 – 10, 2019. Site.

XII Brazilian Symposium on Glass and Related Materials. Lavras, MG (Brazil). October 22 – 25, 2019. Site.

19th Brazilian Workshop on Semiconductor Physics. Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). November 18 – 22, 2019. Site.

XIX B-MRS Meeting and 2020 IUMRS ICEM (International Conference on Electronic Materials). Foz do Iguaçu, PR (Brazil). August 30 – September 3, 2020. Site.

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You can suggest news, opportunities, events or reading tips in the materials field to be covered by B-MRS Newsletter. Write to comunicacao@sbpmat.org.br.

 

 

Royal Society of Chemistry put together a collection of paper of Brazilian authors in honour of XVIII B-MRS Meeting.


RSC_collectionThe Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) has prepared an online collection of articles by Brazilian authors in celebration of the XVIII B-MRS Meeting (Balneário Camboriú, September 22-26, 2019). The Royal Society of Chemistry is a supporter of this edition of B-MRS’s annual event.

Titled Materials and Nano Research in Brazil, the collection brings together 55 articles published in RSC journals between 2017 and 2019. All selected articles are open access until October 15, 2019.

The collection is available at www.rsc.li/brazil-mrs-2019

B-MRS Newsletter. Year 6, issue 7.


 

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Newsletter of the
Brazilian Materials
Research Society

Year 6, issue 7. August 7, 2019.

B-MRS Public Notice

The directory and board of the Brazilian Materials Research Society (B-MRS) are in solidarity with the Director of INPE, Prof. Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, with regard to the unsubstantiated claims by President Jair Bolsonaro (…)

Access here the full public notice.

B-MRS News

– XIX B-MRS Meeting + IUMRS-ICEM 2020 (Iguassu Falls, Brazil, August 30 to September 3, 2020). The Brazilian Materials Research Society (B-MRS) and the International Union of Materials Research Societies (IUMRS) invite the international scientific community to submit symposium proposals for the joint event that will include B-MRS annual event and the IUMRS International Electronic Materials Conference. The symposium call is open until October 31, 2019. Learn more, here.

Elections at B-MRS. The electoral commission has already approved the nominations. Get to know the candidates on the ticket for the Executive Board and the list of members who showed interest in being elected members of the Deliberative Council, here. Voting time will be from September 22 to October 4, 2019. Members with paid membership annuity will be able to vote online in their member areas on the B-MRS website or in person during the XVIII B-MRS Meeting, at the venue.

Featured Paper

A multidisciplinary scientific team developed in Brazilian laboratories a nanomaterial with interesting magnetic, luminescent and biochemical properties, and found its low toxicity in in vivo tests performed with zebrafish embryos. This nanomaterial can act as a nanoplatform for the development of healthcare, biotechnology and environmental applications. A paper about the work was recently published and featured on cover of ACS Applied Nano Materials. Know more.

artigo news

Featured Scientist

We interviewed Professor Julia Greer of the California Institute of Technology (USA). Author of seminal contributions to nanomechanics, the scientist, who is also a pianist, currently develops innovative three-dimensional structures based on nanomaterials, and studies on how their superior properties arise from the interaction between atomic, nano and micro scales. At the XVIII B-MRS Meeting, she will give a talk about these interesting metamaterials. See our interview.

julia greer

From Idea to Innovation

Innoma intends to spread innovation in the Brazilian industry. The startup develops technologies to produce high-efficiency nanoactives that can be used as raw materials by companies in various segments. The first product, an antimicrobial silver nanoactive, is already being marketed. Know more about Innoma here.

logo innoma

News from B-MRS Members

– Paper of B-MRS member Oswaldo Luiz Alves (IQ – Unicamp) is selected for collection of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Know more.

banner evento

XVIII B-MRS Meeting
(Balneário Camboriú, Brazil, September 22 – 26, 2019)

Website: www.sbpmat.org.br/18encontro/

Registration. Early registration (with special fees) was extended to August 9. Know more, here.

Program. The program of the event “at a glance” is online, showing technical and social activities and the distribution of oral and poster sessions. See here.

Posters printing service. The poster file can be sent by email and later pick up the impression at the event location. Know more, here.

Venue. The meeting will be held in the delightful Balneário Camboriú at the Hotel Sibara Flat & Conventions, located in the center of the city, close to many hotels, restaurants and shops, and only 100 meters from the sea. More information, here.

Opening ceremony venue. The opening ceremony, the memorial lecture and the welcome cocktail will be held on September 22 (Sunday) at the Cristo Luz complex, one of the main tourist attractions in the city. There will be transportation to the venue, leaving the Hotel Sibara from 17:00 on. Know more about this place, here.

Memorial Lecture. The traditional Memorial Lecture Joaquim da Costa Ribeiro will be given by Professor Yvonne Primerano Mascarenhas (IFSC – USP). Know more about the speaker, here.

Event party. The party will be held in the lounge of the Green Valley, a prominent nightclub. Learn more about Green Valley, here. The party will feature the striking Brothers band. Watch the Brothers, here.

Host city. Balneário Camboriú (SC) is an important tourist destination that offers urban and wild beaches, ecotourism and adventure sports, boat trips, bicycles and cable cars – all within a unique landscape that combines mountains, sea and skyscrapers. The visitor has access to many options of gastronomy, lodging and shopping, as well as the bustling nightlife that stands out in the Brazilian scenario.

Lodging, tickets, transfers etc. Check the hotel options and the official travel agency of the event, here.

Plenary lectures. Leading scientists from institutions in Germany, Italy, Spain and the United States will deliver plenary talks on cutting-edge issues at the event. There will also be a plenary session by the Brazilian scientist Antônio José Roque da Silva, director of CNPEM and the Sirius project (new Synchrotron Light Lab). Learn more about the plenary sessions, here.

Symposia. 23 symposia proposed by the international scientific community compose this edition of the event. See the symposia list, here.

Organization. The chair of the event is Professor Ivan Helmuth Bechtold (Physics Department of UFSC) and the co-chair is Professor Hugo Gallardo (Department of Chemistry of UFSC). The program committee is formed by professors Iêda dos Santos (UFPB), José Antônio Eiras (UFSCar), Marta Rosso Dotto (UFSC) and Mônica Cotta (Unicamp). Get to know all the organizers, here.

Exhibitors and sponsors. 41 companies have already confirmed their participation in the event. Those interested in sponsoring/support can contact Alexandre at the e-mail comercial@sbpmat.org.br.

Reading Tips

– 2018 Impact factors: results from ACS Publications journals. Know more.

– Optical computing: metamaterial solves equation by processing optical signals (Science paper). Know more.

– Scientists from Brazil develop tumor cell membrane nanocapsules that carry drugs across the body and release them into tumors to fight cancer by combining hyperthermia and chemotherapy (paper from Applied Bio Materials). Know more.

Events

20th International Sol-Gel Conference. Saint Petersburg (Russia). August 25 – 30, 2019. Site.

2nd CINE-M2P workshop. São Paulo, SP (Brazil). August 26 – 27, 2019. Site.

V Reunião Anual sobre Argilas Aplicadas. Franca, SP (Brazil). August 28 – 30, 2019. Site.

21st Materials Research Society of Serbia Annual Conference (YUCOMAT 2019) and 11th IISS World Round Table Conference on Sintering (WRTCS 2019). Herceg Novi (Montenegro). September 2 – 6, 2019. Site.

R2B Research to Business Itália-Rio de Janeiro. Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). September 19, 2019. Site.

XVIII B-MRS Meeting. Balneário Camboriú, SC (Brazil). September 22 – 26, 2019. Site.

XL CBRAVIC (Brazilian Congress on Vacuum Applications in Industry and Science). October, 7 – 11, 2019. Site.

XII Brazilian Symposium on Glass and Related Materials. Lavras, MG (Brazil). October 22 – 25, 2019. Site.

19th Brazilian Workshop on Semiconductor Physics. Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). November 18 – 22, 2019. Site.

XIX B-MRS Meeting e 2020 IUMRS ICEM (International Conference on Electronic Materials). Foz do Iguaçu, PR (Brazil). August 30 -September 3, 2020. Site.

Follow us on social media

You can suggest news, opportunities, events or reading tips in the materials field to be covered by B-MRS Newsletter. Write to comunicacao@sbpmat.org.br.